Sindoor

Sindoor

Sindooram is a traditional red or orange-red colored cosmetic powder from India, usually worn by married women along the parting of their hair.Use of sindooram denotes that a woman is married in many Hindu communities, and ceasing to wear it usually implies widowhood. The main component of modern sindooram is usually vermilion.[citation needed]. Traditionally, Sindooram is made from Bixaorellana pods, but commercial sindooram contain synthetic dyes and chemicals like Vermilion containing Mercury and Lead.
 
Sindooram is traditionally applied at the beginning or completely along the parting-line of a woman’s hair (also called maang in Hindi) or as a dot on the forehead ("bindi" in Hindi) or bottu in Telugu. Sindooram is the mark of a married woman in Hinduism. Single women wear the dot in different colors but do not apply sindooram in their parting of the hairline. Widows do not wear sindooram, signifying that their husband is no longer alive.
The sindooram is first applied to the woman by her husband on the day of her wedding; this is called the SindooramDaanam ceremony.After this, she applies it herself every day.

A similar coloring ritual is known as pasupukumkuma, named after another name for sindooram, kumkuma.
Sindooram is traditionally applied at the beginning or completely along the parting-line of a woman’s hair (also called maang in Hindi) or as a dot on the forehead ("bindi" in Hindi) or bottu in Telugu. Sindooram is the mark of a married woman in Hinduism. Single women wear the dot in different colors but do not apply sindooram in their parting of the hairline. Widows do not wear sindooram, signifying that their husband is no longer alive.

The sindooram is first applied to the woman by her husband on the day of her wedding; this is called the SindooramDaanam ceremony.After this, she applies it herself every day.

A similar coloring ritual is known as pasupukumkuma, named after another name for sindooram, kumkuma.The wiping off of the sindooram is very significant for a widow. There are many rituals associated with this practice. The most common is when a mother-in-law or older sister-in-law wipes off the sindooram when a woman becomes a widow. The widow will break her bangles and remove her bottu as well, and many will also remove their nose ring and toe rings.

The red sindooram is significant for the married woman as she is full of colour. When she becomes a widow she adopts plain white dress and removes all colour from her face including the bright red sindooram.